AppWorlds 2014

Overall Impression

Last year there were a lot of companies that concentrate on analytics and HTML5 while this year the trends seem to be more diverse. The companies that caught my eye were

  • Jumio (http://www.jumio.com/netswipe/). Their Netswipe product provides real time Credit/Debit Card number recognition. It’s a card scan by optical card recognition (vs magnetic strip swipe)
  • Appsee (http://www.appsee.com). This company concentrates on A/B testing and they have given me a comprehensive demo of what A/B testing is and what you can do with it
  • Moxtra (www.moxtra.com). This company presented MeetSDK which is an SDK for embedding online meeting experience into custom apps. The experience is similar to Goto meeting or Google hangouts, where in addition to video chat there is a screen sharing capability.

Attended talks

Use A/B testing to build better apps (Chris Beauchamp from Kii)

A/B testing seems to be the next evolutionary step for just collecting metrics. The idea is to control provide optional data, screen presentations and screen flows for real-time users and then collect metrics. A/B testing requires a slightly different development approach and thus most of the talk was broken down into pros and cons of A/B testing.

Pros:

  • Features can be turned on / off instantaneously. A real life example given by Chris describing how he accidentally released one of the features intended for demo purposes and the feature was only taken down 2 weeks later after AppStore approved patch release.
  • Better segmentation. If currently with KISSMetrics we collect data on ALL of the users, A/B testing platforms can only target certain segments of their user base without disrupting the core users.

Cons:

  • QA and dev overhead. When we release support with various flow and display options we must QA these beforehand. With iOS7 and autoupdates it seems like an alternative could be just having each bi-weekly release as an experiment

Agile development for mobile (Crashlytics and Twitter)

Quick and short list of takeaways

  • Releasing a new version of your mobile app bi-weekly is acceptable amongst users. More frequent updates are not.
  • Dogfooding. Using your company employees as beta testers.  While your app is awaiting approval in the app store, you can have a local dogfood release to your fellow coworkers. So, once the app is in the App Store , you might already know the top 10 issues with it and start working on a patch release immediately.
  • In the experience of Twitter mobile dev top most frequent bugs compose 90% of the issues.

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