Tips on UI Automation of iOS Applications

Automation support for iOS apps is still a relatively new technology and like all other technologies that are still quite not mature it has a lot of challenges. Below I would like to discuss one of such challenges, identifying and accessing individual custom cells inside a UITableView

Let’s say we create a new phone book application and let’s say that the 3 pieces of information that this application stores are: the last and the first name of the contact along with the type of contact that this person is (family, friend, work). The contact type would be displayed in a non-text form (an icon for instance). Let’s also assume that there would be a screen that lists all the contacts that we have in our phone book and that is the screen that we are going to test.

As of right now every table cell is identified via all the text field values augmented inside of them. For example, a cell for John Smith can be accessed via the following statement:

target.frontMostApp().mainWindow().tableViews()["Empty list"].cells()["John Smith"];

The problem with this identification scheme is that potentially it lacks uniqueness. if we have 2 John Smiths we would not be able to distinguish between the two cells. Moreover, what if one John Smith is classified as family while the other one is a friend, we cannot query how these contacts are classified since these values are non textual

This is when accessibilityLabel property comes to our rescue. In our example, we want to encode 2 non-textual values in the accessibilityLabel. By using the following formula to generate accessibilityLabel for {record unique id},{contact type description} not only do we generate unique identifiers for the table cells but we can now query the contact type of the corresponding record for the cell. In our example the two accessibilityLabel values for the 2 John Smiths (assuming their unique record ids are 1 and 2 respectively) could be accessed via the following statements:

   target.frontMostApp().mainWindow().tableViews()["Empty list"].cells()["1,family"]; 
   target.frontMostApp().mainWindow().tableViews()["Empty list"].cells()["2,friend"];

The native code for creation of cells would look something like this

-(UITableViewCell *) tableView:(UITableView *) tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSindexPath *) indexPath  
{ 
   UITableViewCell * res = … 
   Contact * c = … 

   //initialize an instance of UITableViewCell 
   //get an instance of Contact that corresponds to the indexPath 
   NSMutableString * accessibilityLabel = [[NSMutableString alloc] init]; 
   [accessibilityLabel appendFormat:@"%d", c.contactId]; 
   if(c.contactType == ContactTypeFriend) 
   { 
      [accessibilityLabel appendString:@",friend"]; 
      res.imageView.image  = [UIImage imageNamed:@"friendsIcon"]; 
   } 
   else if(c.contactType == ContactTypeFamily) 
   { 
     [accessibilityLabel appendString:@",family"]; 
     res.imageView.image  = [UIImage imageNamed:@"familyIcon"]; 
   } 
   else 
   { 
     [accessibilityLabel appendString:@",work"]; 
     res.imageView.image  = [UIImage imageNamed:@"workIcon"]; 
   } 
   res.acessibilityLabel  = accessibilityLabel; 
   [accessibilityLabel release]; 

   return res; 
}

If we want to access a cell for a contact with a known record id but unknown status we would need to write some additional JavaScript code

function findCellByRecordId(recordId)
{
   var cells = target.frontMostApp().mainWindow().tableViews()["Empty list"].cells();
   for(var i=0; i < cells.length; i++) 
   { 
      var cell = cells[i]; 

      //parse the name and check the first part 
      var cellNameParts = cell.name().split(","); 
      if(cellNameParts[0] == ("" + recordId)) 
      { 
         return cell; 
      } 
   } 

   //at this point we did not find anything 
   return null; 
}

Now we have means to locate cells based on contact unique record id, we would want to have an ability to see query what kind of contact type this cell shows

function getRecordTypeFromCell(cell)
{
   return cell.name().parts[1];
}

Now that you can access cells based on the unique record id of the contact that these cells represent as well as the ability to query the status of the contact, you can start writing automated tests for this screen. Happy unit testing!

Note: download sample Phone Book project

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